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Thread: Is Mego Missing the Mark?

  1. #21
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    Design by committee, when I was at Hasbro everything had to go through 3 review teams, art department, legal and marketing. that means 2/3 of the people making the decisions are not necessarily able to visualize, and then there are request from the various vendors and licencors on top of that. Honestly it is a miracle when something truly special makes it through the whole process.

  2. #22
    No fault of Mego's but being a MOC / MIB collector I decided not to buy the Super Heroes simply because of the cards. The figures look great but I really dislike those New 52 character designs. They don't match the figures they are supposed to represent. Were those three figures on retro cards they would already be in my collection.

  3. #23
    I'm the opposite, I guess, as far as card art goes. I open every package, so all of that just ends up in garbage or recycling. I do notice excellent card art (for example, FTC Swamp Thing) but card art has zero bearing on whether or not I purchase an action figure. For me, the quality/aesthetics of the figure is what determines my purchase. Not that I'm criticizing those who are all about the packaging---just putting a different perspective out there.

  4. #24
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    I noticed during Halloween certain candy displays, which showcased DC heroes, carried the exact same artwork as the Mego heroes. Its really unfortunate that modern business models are so married to stringent guidelines they overlook the fact that uniformity to product branding is not a one-size-fits-all concept. Where a can of Coke might need to maintain the same logo, color scheme, and taste, superheroes span generations of fans and should be open to those images that are most iconic to the product/character you're selling. I mean there's as much product uniformity to a Neal Adams Batman as there is a generic picture. Its still the same character. But one will inspire kids to grab the product, while the other dulls the senses. If you're selling a KISS show do you show them standing on a multi-million dollar stage or do you show them standing in someone's back yard with kids waving sparklers? It's really unfortunate that corporate nimrods in charge of licensing can not see past the spirit of these guidelines and understand the intent is to encourage sells, not dampen them. I can certainly appreciate why Mego pushes some of the generic licensing because that allows them freedom to make the kind of packaging they want. But in terms of the original question, I think Mego is starting to find their footing and make some great character selections. Its a fun time to be in this hobby and I wish them much success.


  5. #25
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    Wow. You'd think they would realize how backwards that thinking is. Arguably the most popular figure cards of all time have always had the character pictured...Kenner Super Powers anyone? Hasbro has made an entire business out of nostalgia just for those cards.
    Too bad. Maybe someday they'll try something different.
    As much as I love Super Powers, I think the best example of the packaging getting kids excited for the figures is G.I. Joe: RAH. The artwork of Hector Garri was so dramatic and exciting, kids never noticed that sometimes...not always...but sometimes the figures were rather...clunky in comparison. To a kid, they were buying the character represented in that awesome artwork, and it automatically made the figure look better in their mind's eye. Those card backs sold the hell out of that toy line.

    It's a shame many of these modern corporate licensing brand managers aren't aware, or don't care, about the history of the products they are putting their brand on.

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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earth 2 Chris View Post
    As much as I love Super Powers, I think the best example of the packaging getting kids excited for the figures is G.I. Joe: RAH. The artwork of Hector Garri was so dramatic and exciting, kids never noticed that sometimes...not always...but sometimes the figures were rather...clunky in comparison. To a kid, they were buying the character represented in that awesome artwork, and it automatically made the figure look better in their mind's eye. Those card backs sold the hell out of that toy line.

    It's a shame many of these modern corporate licensing brand managers aren't aware, or don't care, about the history of the products they are putting their brand on.

    Absolutely. Kenner Star Wars is another example. Hasbro has made an entire business out of selling reissued figures on those awesome vintage style card backs.
    Of course, when you look at the entire state of DC Comics right now, it's pretty obvious the people in charge have no clue what they're doing.

  7. #27
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    Posted this in MegoMania, the style guide in action, some of these are my products. Believe it or not, some people still challenged me. The need to pursue this weird "Mego bad" narrative is strong in some people, kind of sad.
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  8. #28
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    ^These examples are so telling. Even Funko POPS couldn’t get around the style guide.

    It also shows the style guide expands beyond toys, into key chains and wallets too. I wonder if WB intended to make their packaging for wallets and clothing items look more sophisticated? To not look like it’s a wallet intended for children on the shelf at Macy’s? Because I get it if that that’s the case.
    Expectation is the death of discovery.

  9. #29
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    Interesting topic. Big companies are baffling sometimes.

  10. #30
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    Excellent examples Brian. And it really supports the whole idea of how tired products become when the packaging all looks the same. You almost forget to look at the actual product because the same graphics are screaming at you. And I'm so conditioned from old school marketing to think similar packaging means its all connected to a series, so its always disappointing to see how unrelated much of it actually is. I never thought the bat symbol would become its own brand like a hood ornament.

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