Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Another thread about fixing toys: Replace broken handlebar on 1st edition stunt cycle

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 15, 2012
    Posts
    197
    Images
    1

    Another thread about fixing toys: Replace broken handlebar on 1st edition stunt cycle

    A couple years ago, I bought yet another lot of Evel Knievel toys. The lot came with a clean figure in the blue suit, a nice looking trail bike (just missing stickers on one side), and a ratty looking 1st edition stunt cycle. The stunt cycle was melted on the bottom, had dried adhesive all over it, no usable stickers, missing trick stand, and a missing handlebar. I cleaned it up and left it as-is for a while. Then last winter I figured out a cheap yet good way to make new stickers for these stunt cycles (Oracal adhesive vinyl). I made a set for this 1st edition cycle and it really sparked my interest again. So I decided to sacrifice the handlebar from a non-functional 2nd version cycle. This repair is not for the faint of heart. And I don't care if I somehow ruined the value of the cycle. I am keeping it. Here is the step-by-step process and pictures.

    1. Cut a square notch into the base of the handlebar for recipient cycle. My goal was to have a bike that can be used. So I wanted the connection to be beefy. You can see in the pictures where the white donor bar meets the chrome.
    2. Drill holes in the inside and bottom of the notch so that metal rod can be inserted to connect the notch and the donor handlebar.
    3. Cut the donor handlebar off (carefully) to fit the notch. I cut it larger than what was needed and filed it down. It took a lot of patience to get it to fit properly.
    4. Drill hole in the base of donor bar slighting bigger than the metal rod. Attach the rods and crazy glue the donor handlebar in place.
    5. On to the crossbar: Drill a small hole in the end of the broken crossbar. Drill other hole where the crossbar will attach to the donor handlebar.
    6. Find styrene tubing that is the same diameter as the original part of the crossbar. Cut the styrene to fit the "gap" between the donor bar and the broken crossbar.
    7. Insert a brass rod through the styrene tube and cut it at both ends so that some of the brass sticks out.
    8. Test fit the crossbar replacement, make adjustments, and then crazy glue it in place.
    9. You now have a repaired but not matching handlebar. I used a modelling product called bare metal foil to cover the white plastic of the repair. Ta da! it's done.









    Last edited by Myoldtoys; May 21, '20 at 4:42 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 19, 2004
    Location
    Southern Jersey
    Posts
    2,015
    Images
    18
    Looks great!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 27, 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia area
    Posts
    707
    Nicely done!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 14, 2003
    Location
    B
    Posts
    25,123
    Images
    594
    Blog Entries
    1
    No joke, in the past week I was just eyeballing one I have missing the entire bar. Your fix is way cleaner than what I had in my head.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 15, 2012
    Posts
    197
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by EMCE Hammer View Post
    No joke, in the past week I was just eyeballing one I have missing the entire bar. Your fix is way cleaner than what I had in my head.
    My first thought was to just cut the round part of the bar and try to match it up. Even with reinforcement inside, it would most like have been only good for display. I went this route to make it stronger. Cutting it with a coping saw also made it easier. This first issue cycle has a unique sound when it runs. None of the others sound like it. I wanted it to be able to run it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •