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Thread: Netflix SDCC She-Ra trailer. Yeah, it's bad.

  1. #61
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    Adam and Cringer predate Filmation. In the 3 issue Mini series DC did Adam acted like a slacker to hide his He-Man identity and Cringer is exactly the same as the Filmation toon. The biggest difference was Adam and Cringer had to run off to the Cavern of Power to turn into He-Man and Battlecat. That had to have been inconvenient.
    You are a bold and courageous person, afraid of nothing. High on a hill top near your home, there stands a dilapidated old mansion. Some say the place is haunted, but you don't believe in such myths. One dark and stormy night, a light appears in the topmost window in the tower of the old house. You decide to investigate... and you never return...

  2. #62
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    Yeah, the preview that ran in the DC Comics had Adam and Cringer, the first time I think they appeared, before the cartoon debuted. I liked that angle, and I honestly didn't mind Adam, because that gave us a Bill Batson/Captain Marvel vibe any kid could appreciate. But I never understood why Adam looked just like He-Man...only without a tan.

    As for that iconic Filmation change, of course I loved it. Had two versions of the play Power Sword, and would mimic the action. Just ONCE I wanted them to NOT show Adam in front of Grayskull when he changed. I seem to recall him falling through the sky, pulling the sword, and suddenly he was standing in front of Grayskull!!! Then he was back to falling after the insert shot.

    Chris
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  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earth 2 Chris View Post
    As for that iconic Filmation change, of course I loved it.
    Me too! I absolutely loved it.
    You are a bold and courageous person, afraid of nothing. High on a hill top near your home, there stands a dilapidated old mansion. Some say the place is haunted, but you don't believe in such myths. One dark and stormy night, a light appears in the topmost window in the tower of the old house. You decide to investigate... and you never return...

  4. #64
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    Getting back to the differences in tone between MOTU and Transformers a bit.

    We have to keep in mind Filmation was under enormous pressure and restrictions on content and violence because of the fantasy magical setting of MOTU. The show was constantly under fire for claims of violence and the use of magic.

    Certain groups in the States absolutely hated He-Man with a burning passion. They thought it was harmful, satanic and trying to indoctrinate children into the occult. There was one episode, in particular, which made those groups go absolutely bonkers, Daimar the Demon. In the episode Orko, looking for someone to play with, accidently summons a demon from a book of spells. The demon at first is friendly and playful and looks like a cute little imp. He gets tired after playing with Orko and falls asleep and cocoons himself. He wakes up as a giant scary looking demon intent on taking over the world because, you know, that's what demons are supposed to do. During the attack on Castle Grayskull Orko reminds him that they are friends and he doesn't have to be evil. He remembers Orko's kindness and decides to choose his own destiny. He chooses friendship, to be good and leaves for his own dimension in peace. That did not sit well with those groups to put it mildly.

    On to Transformers, I remember from watching the bonus features and the writers admitted they could get away with stuff in content and violence that other cartoons of the era couldn't because their characters were robots and not technically alive. They could shoot them, blow them up, etc. The show having a scifi setting instead of magical one also helped them fly under the radar a bit more.
    Last edited by Werewolf; Jan 31, '19 at 10:47 PM. Reason: typos
    You are a bold and courageous person, afraid of nothing. High on a hill top near your home, there stands a dilapidated old mansion. Some say the place is haunted, but you don't believe in such myths. One dark and stormy night, a light appears in the topmost window in the tower of the old house. You decide to investigate... and you never return...

  5. #65
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    All valid points. And let's not forget Lou Scheimer didn't understand what was appealing about MOTU to many people. And half the people in charge of the brand at Mattel didn't either. It led to Filmation being able to pretty much do what they want and dictate to Mattel at times or completely ignore Mattel at other times. When the right hand doesn't know what the left is doing, no wonder you end up with such a confusing end product.

    Meanwhile Hasbro had a much tighter hand in what was going on with Transformers, GI Joe, etc. While everything didn't always match up, there was a lot more cohesion. And they also had a mastermind like Larry Hama working on the Joe comics who could come up with a filecard and a great comic backstory for darn near every character (often to his chagrin) and the toon, while not always following suit, usually didn't stray quite as far away.

    Mattel could NEVER get a handle on what MOTU was. To their detriment in the end. Heck, they still don't. They way they poorly mismanaged MOTUC showed that and anyone who followed that whole debacle up close could see that Mattel still after all these years didn't really understand what MOTU was and how to market it.

  6. #66
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    Filmation having creative control over the cartoon was a good thing, in my opinion. I remember there was this one toy Mattel insisted on having in the cartoon and Filmation absolutely refused. They called it the Ballbuster, seriously. Filmation was like, yeah, that's not gonna happen. Eventually the ballbuster did get released in a more market friendly name as the Bashasaurus.
    You are a bold and courageous person, afraid of nothing. High on a hill top near your home, there stands a dilapidated old mansion. Some say the place is haunted, but you don't believe in such myths. One dark and stormy night, a light appears in the topmost window in the tower of the old house. You decide to investigate... and you never return...

  7. #67
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    I think Mattel's designers at the time thought it was the action features sold the toys and were always looking for the next gimmick to build a figure around. But what really sold the toys was the love of the characters they had created. I don't think they really got that at the time. Kids wanted figures of their favorite characters and the action features were a fun added bonus.
    You are a bold and courageous person, afraid of nothing. High on a hill top near your home, there stands a dilapidated old mansion. Some say the place is haunted, but you don't believe in such myths. One dark and stormy night, a light appears in the topmost window in the tower of the old house. You decide to investigate... and you never return...

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