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Thread: Did anyone really want President dolls as a kid?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwyblejr View Post
    Eisenhower was made from when he served in WWII like JFK.
    Ahh. I should have known that. It makes sense. Cool.
    ---

    Speaking of authors, I probably would get an H.G. Wells figure, a few others and maybe Time Machine movie toys. Tolkien would be a good one. Robert E. Howard could become an interesting action figure. Then you could sit Bob down at his desk and have a Conan figure standing behind him, demanding that Howard finish the tale.

  2. #22
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    With the exception of Poe, Stephen King, and Hunter S. Thompson, I have no idea what any authors look like. Paint a mustache on a Shazam head and put it on a Robert Heinlein card and I wouldn't know the difference.

  3. #23
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    I never did. so we ended up selling them at the Swap Meet
    ]https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/superfriends/images/7/78/World%27s_Greatest_Super-Heroes_-_DC_Characters.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20140106164547

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Werewolf View Post
    The news letter got me thinking about this again and I didn't want to take that thread off topic.

    I understand historic figures like Daniel Boone at least that has some play value. But Presidents? Let's be totally honest on this. Put yourself back in time, you're a kid with limited toy money and you have Big Jim in one hand and George Washington in the other. Do you really choose the guy in the powdered wig over Big Jim? Were there really kids begging for a Ben Franklin doll for Christmas? I probably would have cried if I had gotten one.

    Also, don't adults tend to collect out of nostalgia? So, I don't really get a big adult market for them either. If you didn't want one as a child why would you want one now?
    Certainly not interested as an adult and largely was not as a kid. However, I have been thinking about your question for a while and one thing I keep coming back to is just how big the buzz surrounding the Bicentennial was and how caught up in all of that people were. I was 7 in 1976 and I can remember being fascinated with Red, White, and Blue this and USA that. It was in comics. It was a theme in advertising. Uncle Sam was everywhere and on everything. And oh, my gawd the endless merchandizing. In school, we were memorizing Longfellow's "Paul Revere's Ride". We were doing Colonial and Revolutionary War lessons. There were these special Quarters that kids were hoarding for years to follow.

    And it wasn't just in 1976. This thing was coming and we ramped up for it for 2 years....at least. CBS started airing a segment in Prime Time on July 4, 1974 called "Bicentennial Minute" and it ran nightly....for two and half years! Schoolhouse Rock had "Shot Heard Round the World" and "The Preamble" and "No More Kings". My birthday cake, in 1975, was white with blue and red pipping and topped by little figures of the three guys from "The Spirit of '76". It was pervasive and had a looooooong lead up to the actual event and a short little period while it all calmed down and became 1977.

    So there is my only argument for why I might have wanted one as a kid and can understand why adults of a certain age might be interested.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Makernaut View Post
    Certainly not interested as an adult and largely was not as a kid. However, I have been thinking about your question for a while and one thing I keep coming back to is just how big the buzz surrounding the Bicentennial was and how caught up in all of that people were. I was 7 in 1976 and I can remember being fascinated with Red, White, and Blue this and USA that. It was in comics. It was a theme in advertising. Uncle Sam was everywhere and on everything. And oh, my gawd the endless merchandizing. In school, we were memorizing Longfellow's "Paul Revere's Ride". We were doing Colonial and Revolutionary War lessons. There were these special Quarters that kids were hoarding for years to follow.

    And it wasn't just in 1976. This thing was coming and we ramped up for it for 2 years....at least. CBS started airing a segment in Prime Time on July 4, 1974 called "Bicentennial Minute" and it ran nightly....for two and half years! Schoolhouse Rock had "Shot Heard Round the World" and "The Preamble" and "No More Kings". My birthday cake, in 1975, was white with blue and red pipping and topped by little figures of the three guys from "The Spirit of '76". It was pervasive and had a looooooong lead up to the actual event and a short little period while it all calmed down and became 1977.

    So there is my only argument for why I might have wanted one as a kid and can understand why adults of a certain age might be interested.
    Yep, I was 9 during the bicentennial, watched Gunsmoke, the Lone Ranger, Johnny Weismiller version of Tarzan, Flash Gordon, 1960's Spider-Man, the Adventures of Superman, Planet of the Apes, Six Million Dollar Man and 1966 Batman as a kid. The bicentennial gave me a feeling of American pride. The area in which I lived gave me a sense of American Indian pride. It all got me interested in history. And my grandmother bought me one of those stiff George Washington figures about the time I was burying Dracula in the backyard. I get nostalgic about the presidential figures because of that memory. But Alan Virdon and Steve Austin were my favorites. I am glad they were produced. And the Funworld figures cusomized onto Mego bodies are short of awesome. But those heroes of the American revolution were a product of 1976. I don't want them but I can certainly appreciate that they exist!

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobub View Post
    But those heroes of the American revolution were a product of 1976. I don't want them but I can certainly appreciate that they exist!
    That's exactly how I feel about them, too.

  7. #27
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    AS a kid, with the Bicentennial going on, the Revolution-era personalities were definitely of interest. And I'd have loved an Abe Lincoln to hang out with my Kirk and Spock.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Makernaut View Post
    one thing I keep coming back to is just how big the buzz surrounding the Bicentennial was and how caught up in all of that people were. I was 7 in 1976 and I can remember being fascinated with Red, White, and Blue this and USA that. It was in comics. It was a theme in advertising. Uncle Sam was everywhere and on everything. And oh, my gawd the endless merchandizing. In school, we were memorizing Longfellow's "Paul Revere's Ride". We were doing Colonial and Revolutionary War lessons. There were these special Quarters that kids were hoarding for years to follow.
    Yep. I was 9 in 1976, and I remember the hype.
    My room was painted RWB. I had RWB blankets, and sheets. My dad even painted my dresser and bookshelf with reds, whites, and blues.
    The hype was everywhere.

    Isn't that when they issued the $2 bills also?

  9. #29
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    I remember the bicentennial quarter. A schoolmate had one and I wanted one. I started collecting coins at that time and my first quest was for mercury dimes. I went to the local store and asked the clerk who was an older neighbor if I could have any for my change, and she said she hadn't seen any for years. Now you can find them at any pawn shop for about $1.50 @. And the $2 bill was reissued in 1976 with the famous Trumbull Declaration of Independence signing on the reverse. In the 1950s it existed with Monticello on back. And I recommend visiting there to anyone reading this. The place leaves me in bicentennial awe. It's awesome as is a visit to colonial Williamsburg for anyone who lived through the bicentennial or is remotely interested in US history, just thinking that when that area was established everything west of there was untamed woodlands. Just imagine.
    Last edited by hobub; May 10, '18 at 8:20 AM.

  10. #30
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    All I know is my daughter's Barbies are scared #$%*less worrying that Bill Clinton and Donald Trump dolls might be in the house.

    And I remember the Bicentennial Minute, too. I loved those segments. Now that I live in South Jersey and work in Philadelphia, I can appreciate the history even more.

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